Monday, June 23, 2008

Associative stage of skill acquisition

The second stage of skill acquisition is the associative stage, which is identified by an emphasis of practice. The learner, having acquired an idea of what the skill is, needs to repeat the movement to enhance the synchronisation of their mind and muscles. errors still occur,but are smaller and less frequent than in the cognitive stage. Feedback is again essential to improve the skill, which the learner repeats frequently in practice. a sense of fluency or smoothness will develop as the learner's kinesthesis improves.
Practice will improve the way the skill is performed. The learner eventually experiences some success. These successes are felt more frequently with additional practice and feedback. Gradually, the learner feels more at ease as their confidence increases.
Learners can remain at this stage for a long period, even years. Some may never progress to the next stage. However, given sufficient practice, most will reach the level at which the skill execution is reasonable automatic. But this does not imply perfection, because performances at the autonomous level vary in their quality.

A great example to admire the smoothness and fluency of two autonomous athletes, is Mahe Drysdale and Rob Waddell's first 250m of their race off for the Beijing single scull position.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxKRAbeZHew&feature=related

8 comments:

celine said...

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Moo Cow said...

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Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

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