Monday, June 23, 2008

The Cognitive stage of skill acquisition

The first stage of skill learning is the cognitive stage. The fundamental requirement here is that the athlete gains an understanding of the task required. This will necessitate knowing what to do and an insight about how to do it. Conceptualisation - or the generation of clear mental pictures of the task - is essential for good movement reproduction. Demonstrations, videos and information highlighting the important points can help guide the learner through the skill. However, coaches must be careful to avoid 'information overload', which would confuse the learner.
It is expected that the learner will encounter problems, the number and magnitude of which will depend on the difficulty of the skill. The learner may experience error, awkwardness and some disorientation. Thus, learners must recieve continuous feedback or information on their progress. If they experience much difficulty, the skill could possibly be broken into smaller movements for practice. During this stage, the learner should experience some success. All positive learning should be reinforced adn encouraged. Many coaches will give drills at this point to improve the learner's coordination and feel for the desired movement.
Rates of progress through the cognitive stage vary from one individual to another. Depending on the difficulty fo the skill, it could be learned in anything from a few minutes to a much longer period. Some difficult skills may never be mastered by some people.

(Above extract taken from: Third Edition, Outcomes 2 HSC Course, Personal Development, Health and Physical Education)

Below: A great example of conceptualisation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P17_N2iV-ZE

4 comments:

Susie the Swimmer said...

Hi Mr B
I am really interested in this stage of skill acquisition as I am studying it for PDHPE and trying to explain to my class all about my own sport. I am a synchronised swimmer, so I am used to everybody doing the same thing as me (such as in the Tiger Woods commercial).

My question is, how can you tell if a student is becoming overloaded with information? What are the signs?

Thanks

Susie

Mohammad Aldhalimi said...

When they look bored

Anonymous said...

How can feedback be used to assist a learner as they progress through the stages of skill acquisition?

Anonymous said...

How can feedback be used to assist a learner as they progress through the stages of skill acquisition?